Putting Feelings Into Words

@article{Lieberman2007PuttingFI,
  title={Putting Feelings Into Words},
  author={M. Lieberman and N. Eisenberger and M. Crockett and Sabrina M. Tom and Jennifer H. Pfeifer and B. Way},
  journal={Psychological Science},
  year={2007},
  volume={18},
  pages={421 - 428}
}
Putting feelings into words (affect labeling) has long been thought to help manage negative emotional experiences; however, the mechanisms by which affect labeling produces this benefit remain largely unknown. Recent neuroimaging studies suggest a possible neurocognitive pathway for this process, but methodological limitations of previous studies have prevented strong inferences from being drawn. A functional magnetic resonance imaging study of affect labeling was conducted to remedy these… Expand
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