Purkinje cell axonal torpedoes are unrelated to advanced aging and likely reflect cerebellar injury

Abstract

Torpedoes, swellings of the proximal Purkinje cell axon, are thought to represent a cellular response to injury [3]. They may occur in a variety of cerebellar disorders [7]. Most recently, their numbers were noted to be six-times higher in essential tremor (ET) than control brains [4]. Torpedoes are also often viewed as a cumulative phenomenon associated with advanced aging [3,4], yet there are surprisingly few supporting data. We quantified torpedoes in normal human cerebella spanning a considerable age range to assess whether torpedoes are a cumulative phenomenon of aging. These data help place the relative abundance of torpedoes in ET in context.

DOI: 10.1007/s00401-009-0534-z

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@article{Louis2009PurkinjeCA, title={Purkinje cell axonal torpedoes are unrelated to advanced aging and likely reflect cerebellar injury}, author={Elan Daniel Louis and Phyllis L. Faust and Jean Paul G. Vonsattel and Cordelia R Erickson-Davis}, journal={Acta Neuropathologica}, year={2009}, volume={117}, pages={719-721} }