Pulsatile tinnitus: contemporary assessment and management

@article{Sismanis2011PulsatileTC,
  title={Pulsatile tinnitus: contemporary assessment and management},
  author={Aristides Sismanis},
  journal={Current Opinion in Otolaryngology \& Head and Neck Surgery},
  year={2011},
  volume={19},
  pages={348–357}
}
  • A. Sismanis
  • Published 1 October 2011
  • Medicine
  • Current Opinion in Otolaryngology & Head and Neck Surgery
Purpose of reviewPulsatile tinnitus is an uncommon otologic symptom, which often presents a diagnostic and management dilemma to the otolaryngologist. The majority of patients with pulsatile tinnitus have a treatable cause. Failure to establish correct diagnosis may have disastrous consequences, because a potentially life-threatening, underlying disorder may be present. The purpose of this review is to familiarize the otolaryngologist with the most common causes, evaluation, and management of… 
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Dilated low-flow venous malformations are the likely source of pulsatile tinnitus in a 65-year-old Caucasian female, which is the first reported case in the literature.
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The various imaging modalities are evaluated to determine which may be the best initial test in patients presenting with unilateral PT and which may lead to significant morbidity and mortality.
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The author reviews how to identify the tinnitus etiology and its treatment and Hyperacusis, a frequent accompaniment of tinnitis, and itstreatment are discussed.
Increasing awareness with recognition of pulsatile tinnitus for nurse practitioners in the primary care setting: A case study.
TLDR
This case study is to provide a structured approach to the identification of pulsatile tinnitus and provide management recommendations and to reduce the risk of delayed or missed diagnosis of this often treatable condition.
Pulsatile tinnitus: a review
Pulsatile tinnitus: a review. Objectives: The aim of this review is to provide an up to date review of the causes, assessment, and management of pulsatile tinnitus. Methods: A search was performed of
Tinnitus pulsátil: Caso clínico y revisión de la literatura
Pulsatile tinnitus is an infrequent otologic symptom but requires a thorough study. A detailed history and physical examination are essential to guide the subsequent imaging study, with which the
Tinnitus, Hyperacusis, Otalgia, and Hearing Loss
TLDR
This review, tailored to neurologists who care for patients who may be referred to or encountered in neurology practice, provides information on hearing disorders, how to recognize when a neurologic process may be involved, and when to refer to otolaryngology or other specialists.
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