Pulsar Wind Nebulae: On their growing diversity and association with highly magnetized neutron stars

@article{SafiHarb2012PulsarWN,
  title={Pulsar Wind Nebulae: On their growing diversity and association with highly magnetized neutron stars},
  author={Samar Safi-Harb},
  journal={Proceedings of the International Astronomical Union},
  year={2012},
  volume={8},
  pages={251 - 256}
}
  • S. Safi-Harb
  • Published 1 August 2012
  • Physics
  • Proceedings of the International Astronomical Union
Abstract The 1968 discovery of the Crab and Vela pulsars in their respective supernova remnants (SNRs) confirmed Baade and Zwicky's 1934 prediction that supernovae form neutron stars. Observations of Pulsar Wind Nebulae (PWNe), particularly with the Chandra X-ray Observatory, have in the past decade opened a new window to focus on the neutron stars' relativistic winds, study their interaction with their hosting SNRs, and find previously missed pulsars. While the Crab has been thought for… 
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