Pulmonary artery occlusion pressure and central venous pressure fail to predict ventricular filling volume, cardiac performance, or the response to volume infusion in normal subjects.

@article{Kumar2004PulmonaryAO,
  title={Pulmonary artery occlusion pressure and central venous pressure fail to predict ventricular filling volume, cardiac performance, or the response to volume infusion in normal subjects.},
  author={Anand Kumar and Ramon L A{\~n}el and Eugene Bunnell and Kalim J Habet and Sergio Zanotti and Stephanie P Marshall and Alex Neumann and Amjad Ali and Mary Cheang and Clifford J. Kavinsky and Joseph E. Parrillo},
  journal={Critical care medicine},
  year={2004},
  volume={32 3},
  pages={691-9}
}
OBJECTIVE Pulmonary artery occlusion pressure and central venous pressure have been considered to be reliable measures of left and right ventricular preload in patients requiring invasive hemodynamic monitoring. Studies in recent years have questioned the correlation between these estimates of ventricular filling pressures and ventricular end-diastolic volumes/cardiac performance variables in specific patient groups, but clinicians have continued to consider the relationship valid in the… CONTINUE READING
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