Puddling in butterflies: sodium affects reproductive success in Thymelicus lineola*

@article{Pivnick1987PuddlingIB,
  title={Puddling in butterflies: sodium affects reproductive success in Thymelicus lineola*},
  author={Kenneth A. Pivnick and Jeremy N McNeil},
  journal={Physiological Entomology},
  year={1987},
  volume={12}
}
ABSTRACT. Adults of many species of Lepidoptera, principally the males, frequent mud puddles, edges of streams, carrion and animal excreta where they imbibe moisture, an activity referred to as ‘puddling’ Sodium ions are the only known stimulus present which cause males of at least two lepidopteran species to drink for extended periods. In the European skipper Thymelicus lineola (Ochsenheimer) (Lepidoptera: Hesperiidae), only males puddle, even though they have concentrations of abdominal… Expand
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