Public health and medical responses to the 1957-58 influenza pandemic.

@article{Henderson2009PublicHA,
  title={Public health and medical responses to the 1957-58 influenza pandemic.},
  author={Donald Ainslie Henderson and Brooke Courtney and Thomas V. Inglesby and Eric S Toner and Jennifer B. Nuzzo},
  journal={Biosecurity and bioterrorism : biodefense strategy, practice, and science},
  year={2009},
  volume={7 3},
  pages={
          265-73
        }
}
As the U.S. prepares to respond this fall and winter to pandemic (H1N1) 2009, a review of the 1957-58 pandemic of Asian influenza (H2N2) could be useful for planning purposes because of the many similarities between the 2 pandemics. Using historical surveillance reports, published literature, and media coverage, this article provides an overview of the epidemiology of and response to the 1957-58 influenza pandemic in the U.S., during which an estimated 25% of the population became infected with… 

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