Public attitudes toward stuttering in Europe: Within-country and between-country comparisons.

@article{StLouis2016PublicAT,
  title={Public attitudes toward stuttering in Europe: Within-country and between-country comparisons.},
  author={Kenneth O. St. Louis and Hilda S{\o}nsterud and Lejla Junuzovi{\'c}-Žuni{\'c} and Donatella Tomaiuoli and Francesca Del Gado and Emilia Caparelli and Mareen Theiling and Cecilie Flobakk and Lise Nesbakken Helmen and Ragnhild Rekve Heitmann and Helene Kvenseth and Sofia Nilsson and Tobias Wetterling and C. Lundstr{\"o}m and Ciara Daly and Margaret Leahy and Laila Tyrrell and David Ward and Marta Węsierska},
  journal={Journal of communication disorders},
  year={2016},
  volume={62},
  pages={
          115-30
        }
}
INTRODUCTION Epidemiological research methods have been shown to be useful in determining factors that might predict commonly reported negative public attitudes toward stuttering. Previous research has suggested that stuttering attitudes of respondents from North America and Europe (i.e., "The West"), though characterized by stereotypes and potential stigma, are more positive than those from several other regions of the world. This inference assumes that public attitudes within various regions… Expand
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  • Medicine, Psychology
  • American journal of speech-language pathology
  • 2020
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Between the ages of 4 and 11 years, children's measured attitudes toward stuttering improved and gradually approximated the attitudes of their parents and the general public. Expand
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TLDR
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