Public Perception of Tourette Syndrome on YouTube

@article{Fat2012PublicPO,
  title={Public Perception of Tourette Syndrome on YouTube},
  author={Mary Jane Lim Fat and Erick Sell and Nick Barrowman and Asif Doja},
  journal={Journal of Child Neurology},
  year={2012},
  volume={27},
  pages={1011 - 1016}
}
We sought to determine public perception surrounding Tourette syndrome through viewers’ responses to videos on YouTube. The top 20 videos on YouTube for search terms Tourette’s, Tourette’s syndrome, Tourette syndrome and tics were selected. The portrayal of Tourette syndrome was assessed as positive, negative, or neutral. Top 10 comments for each video were graded as “sympathetic,” “neutral,” or “derogatory.” A total of 14 970 hits were obtained and 41 videos were retained, with an average of… 

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