Public Opinion Polling by Newspapers in the Presidential Election Campaign of 1824

@article{Tankard1972PublicOP,
  title={Public Opinion Polling by Newspapers in the Presidential Election Campaign of 1824},
  author={J. Tankard},
  journal={Journalism \& Mass Communication Quarterly},
  year={1972},
  volume={49},
  pages={361 - 365}
}
  • J. Tankard
  • Published 1972
  • Political Science
  • Journalism & Mass Communication Quarterly
However, less than one-tenth of all jobs held by women on the news-executives’ newspapers fell into the executive category. And among women who were news-executives, nearly half worked as women’s section editors, The other most popular news spots for women were assistant city editor and Sunday magazine editor. Women aren’t news-executives now, the responding managing editors argued, because they failed to seek newspaper work in large numbers a decade ago. So most women lack the seniority that… Expand
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