Public Insurance and Mortality: Evidence from Medicaid Implementation

@article{GoodmanBacon2018PublicIA,
  title={Public Insurance and Mortality: Evidence from Medicaid Implementation},
  author={Andrew Goodman-Bacon},
  journal={Journal of Political Economy},
  year={2018},
  volume={126},
  pages={216 - 262}
}
This paper provides new evidence that Medicaid’s introduction reduced infant and child mortality in the 1960s and 1970s. Mandated coverage of all cash welfare recipients induced substantial cross-state variation in the share of children immediately eligible for the program. Before Medicaid, higher- and lower-eligibility states had similar infant and child mortality trends. After Medicaid, public insurance utilization increased and mortality fell more rapidly among children and infants in high… Expand
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A later-life decline in the rate of disease-related mortality for black cohorts born after the cutoff is found, and there is no evidence of a similar mortality improvement for white children. Expand
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