Psychosocial work environment and risk of ischemic stroke and coronary heart disease: a prospective longitudinal study of 75 236 construction workers.

@article{Schiler2015PsychosocialWE,
  title={Psychosocial work environment and risk of ischemic stroke and coronary heart disease: a prospective longitudinal study of 75 236 construction workers.},
  author={Linus Schi{\"o}ler and Mia S{\"o}derberg and Annika Rosengren and Bengt J{\"a}rvholm and Kjell Tor{\'e}n},
  journal={Scandinavian journal of work, environment \& health},
  year={2015},
  volume={41 3},
  pages={
          280-7
        }
}
OBJECTIVES The present study aimed to investigate whether different dimensions of psychosocial stress, as measured by the job demand-control model (JDC), were associated with increased risks of ischemic stroke and coronary heart disease (CHD). METHODS A cohort of 75 236 male construction workers was followed from 1989-2004. Exposure to psychosocial stress was determined by a questionnaire answered in 1989-1993. Events of ischemic stroke and CHD were found by linkage to the Swedish Causes of… Expand
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