Psychosocial interventions in cardiovascular disease – what are they?

@article{Thompson2013PsychosocialII,
  title={Psychosocial interventions in cardiovascular disease – what are they?},
  author={David R Thompson and Chantal F. Ski},
  journal={European Journal of Preventive Cardiology},
  year={2013},
  volume={20},
  pages={916 - 917}
}
  • D. Thompson, C. Ski
  • Published 7 June 2013
  • Psychology
  • European Journal of Preventive Cardiology
There is growing interest in psychosocial factors in the etiology and prognosis of coronary heart disease. There is also recent interest in psychosocial interventions as a means to improve outcome in this patient group, including those with chronic heart failure or referred for cardiac rehabilitation, and for their support givers. However, there is a lack of consistency in the way psychosocial interventions are defined, delivered and tested, thus complicating or rendering meaningless any… 

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