Psychosocial Adjustment in Children and Adolescents with a Craniofacial Anomaly: Age and Sex Patterns

@article{Pope2005PsychosocialAI,
  title={Psychosocial Adjustment in Children and Adolescents with a Craniofacial Anomaly: Age and Sex Patterns},
  author={Alice W. Pope and Heather T. Snyder},
  journal={The Cleft Palate-Craniofacial Journal},
  year={2005},
  volume={42},
  pages={349 - 354}
}
Objective To examine rates of psychosocial adjustment problems and competencies in a sample of children with congenital craniofacial anomalies (CFAs). Methods Retrospective chart review. Setting Urban hospital plastic surgery primary care unit. Patients A total of 724 children aged 2 to 18 years with completed Child Behavior Checklists in their medical charts. Main Outcome Measure Child Behavior Checklist. Results Higher rates of problems in the clinical range were seen for withdrawn, attention… 

Tables from this paper

Psychosocial Adjustment in Children and Adolescents with a Craniofacial Anomaly: Diagnosis-Specific Patterns

  • Heather T. SnyderA. Pope
  • Medicine, Psychology
    The Cleft palate-craniofacial journal : official publication of the American Cleft Palate-Craniofacial Association
  • 2010
TLDR
Specific patterns of strengths and weaknesses in psychosocial adjustment may vary by craniofacial anomaly diagnosis, and replication of these findings is warranted.

Psychosocial Adjustment in Adolescents with Craniofacial Anomalies: A Comparison of Parent and Self-Reports

TLDR
Adolescents with CFAs showed elevated risk for problems with academics and peer relationships; there was limited evidence for clinical levels of other adjustment problems.

Discrepancies in Parent Perceptions and Patient-Reported Psychosocial Function in Children with Craniofacial Anomalies.

TLDR
These discrepancies in the current work highlight the importance of child self-report and suggest incorporating longitudinal patient-reported and parent-proxy-reported outcomes measures for psychosocial functioning as part of standard clinical care for patients with craniofacial anomalies.

Psychosocial Functioning of Children in a Craniofacial Support Group

  • Alexis L. JohnsL. Bava
  • Psychology, Medicine
    The Cleft palate-craniofacial journal : official publication of the American Cleft Palate-Craniofacial Association
  • 2019
TLDR
Patients and caregivers reported significantly improved psychosocial functioning following group participation, particularly for adaptive skills and self-esteem, following participation in support groups for pediatric patients with craniofacial diagnoses.

Adolescents with Craniofacial Anomalies: Psychosocial Adjustment as a Function of Self-Concept

TLDR
Adolescent dissatisfaction with appearance is linked to psychosocial adjustment problems only when it is part of a negative overall view of the self.

Risk and Protective Factors at Age 16: Psychological Adjustment in Children with a Cleft Lip and/or Palate

  • K. FeragenN. StockI. L. Kvalem
  • Psychology, Medicine
    The Cleft palate-craniofacial journal : official publication of the American Cleft Palate-Craniofacial Association
  • 2015
TLDR
The main factor influencing psychological adjustment across domains was gender, with girls in general reporting more psychological problems, as seen in reference groups, and areas of both risk and strength in adolescents born with a cleft lip and/or palate are found.

Emotional and Behavioral Problems in Children With a Cleft Lip With or Without Palate or an Infantile Hemangioma

TLDR
This study examines emotional and behavioral problems in children with a cleft lip with or without palate or an infantile hemangioma in relation to the visibility of the condition, the presence of additional condition-related problems, and parental affect.

Psychosocial Adjustment of Patients with Congenital Craniofacial Malformations

  • T. Meyer
  • Medicine, Psychology
    Fundamentals of Craniofacial Malformations
  • 2021
TLDR
An overview of the impact of orofacial clefts and other congenital craniofacial malformations including craniosynostosis on the development of the self-concept and social competence as well as parental acceptance is provided.

Psychosocial Adjustments Among Adolescents With Craniofacial Conditions and the Influence of Social Factors: A Multi-Informant Study

TLDR
Adolescents with CFA, and to a lesser extent CL/P, may be at a higher risk of having psychosocial problems, and social factors, especially being bullied or having a good friend, may predict the psychossocial well-being of adolescents with craniofacial conditions.

Psychological adjustment to craniofacial conditions (excluding oral clefts): A review of the literature

TLDR
A review of 41 papers published between January 2000 and March 2016 pertaining to psychological adjustment to CFAs identified a number of gaps in the literature, such as the inclusion of a wide range of diagnoses within research samples.
...

References

SHOWING 1-10 OF 38 REFERENCES

The psychosocial adjustment of pediatric craniofacial patients after surgery.

The postsurgical psychological status of 25 craniofacial patients, 6 through 16 years of age, was studied using self, teacher, and parent report measures. In contrast to earlier reports of more

Psychological Functioning of Children with Craniofacial Anomalies and Their Mothers: Follow-Up from Late Infancy to School Entry

TLDR
Twenty-three mothers and their 5- to 7-year-old children with craniofacial anomalies who were assessed during the child's infancy were followed and individual differences In child functioning within the CFA group were predicted by observational measures of earlier mother-Infant interaction during play and teaching situations.

Psychological issues in craniofacial care: state of the art.

  • M. C. EndrigaK. Kapp‐Simon
  • Psychology
    The Cleft palate-craniofacial journal : official publication of the American Cleft Palate-Craniofacial Association
  • 1999
This article is an extensive review of the psychological literature on cleft lip and palate and other craniofacial anomalies. Issues of parental acceptance, social competence, self-concept, emotional

A Developmental Framework for Psychosocial Research on Young Children with Craniofacial Anomalies

TLDR
Young children with craniofacial anomalies and their families undergo a succession of extremely stressful events through the first five years of life, beginning with the parents’ awareness of and coping with the infants’ disfigurement at birth, followed by extraordinary caregiving demands and the initial reactions of friends and relatives to the babies’ appearance.

Progress and limitations in the psychological study of craniofacial anomalies.

TLDR
Although the majority of children with CFA appear to show normal psychosocial development, various psychological risk factors have been identified that may compromise the child's psychological adjustment, such as parental guilt or overprotectiveness, stigmatizing social responses to speech impairment or facial disfigurement, and certain neuropsychological limitations.

Self-perception, social skills, adjustment, and inhibition in young adolescents with craniofacial anomalies.

TLDR
Social skills and athletic competence are the best predictors of adjustment and accounted for 73.5% of the variance in adjustment, and social inhibition is associated with degree of inhibition, with more poorly adjusted adolescents displaying greater inhibition.

Factors associated with peer social competence in preadolescents with craniofacial anomalies.

TLDR
Preadolescents with relatively greater social competence reported more frequent companionship with peers, and more positive Harter (1985) Self-Perception Profile for Children perceptions of physical appearance and scholastic and athletic competence; their parents were more likely to encourage them to interact with peers.

Social and Psychological Effects of Major Craniofacial Deformity

TLDR
It is concluded that individuals with the most severe forms of craniofacial deformities are at risk for experiencing social and psychological stress and for having their quality of life negatively impacted by the experience of having a facial deformity.

Observed social interaction patterns in adolescents with and without craniofacial conditions.

  • K. Kapp‐SimonD. Mcguire
  • Medicine, Psychology
    The Cleft palate-craniofacial journal : official publication of the American Cleft Palate-Craniofacial Association
  • 1997
TLDR
A significant number of children with CFC behaved differently than their peers in a natural, daily occurring situation and were often at the periphery of the group, observers rather than participants in conversation.

Children's attitudes toward interacting with peers with different craniofacial anomalies.

TLDR
Boys and girls differed in their willingness to interact with unfamiliar peers with and without facial distinctions, lending some support to the proposal that high "background attractiveness" can overshadow the impact of a craniofacial anomaly.