Psychosocial Adjustment in Adolescents with Craniofacial Anomalies: A Comparison of Parent and Self-Reports

@article{Snyder2005PsychosocialAI,
  title={Psychosocial Adjustment in Adolescents with Craniofacial Anomalies: A Comparison of Parent and Self-Reports},
  author={Heather T. Snyder and Monica J Bilboul and Alice W. Pope},
  journal={The Cleft Palate-Craniofacial Journal},
  year={2005},
  volume={42},
  pages={548 - 555}
}
Objective To assess rates of psychosocial adjustment problems in adolescents with craniofacial anomalies (CFAs) and to evaluate the correspondence between adolescent and parent reports of adjustment. Design Retrospective chart review. Setting Reconstructive plastic surgery department in urban medical center. Participants Sixty-four adolescents aged 14 to 18 years with CFAs and their parents. Main Outcome Measures Child Behavior Checklist, Youth Self-Report. Results Adolescent and parent reports… 

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