Psychophysiological evidence for cortisol-induced reduction in early bias for implicit social threat in social phobia

@article{Peer2010PsychophysiologicalEF,
  title={Psychophysiological evidence for cortisol-induced reduction in early bias for implicit social threat in social phobia},
  author={Jacobien M. van Peer and Philip Spinhoven and Karin Roelofs},
  journal={Psychoneuroendocrinology},
  year={2010},
  volume={35},
  pages={21-32}
}
The stress hormone cortisol is important for the regulation of social motivational processes. High cortisol levels have been associated with social fear and avoidance, which play an important role in social anxiety disorder (SAD), as does hypervigilant processing of social threat. However, causal effects of cortisol on threat processing in SAD remain unclear. In an event-related potential (ERP) study we investigated the effects of cortisol on task-irrelevant (implicit) processing of social… CONTINUE READING

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