Psychophysics of reading XX. Linking letter recognition to reading speed in central and peripheral vision

@article{Legge2001PsychophysicsOR,
  title={Psychophysics of reading XX. Linking letter recognition to reading speed in central and peripheral vision},
  author={G. Legge and J. Mansfield and Susana T. L. Chung},
  journal={Vision Research},
  year={2001},
  volume={41},
  pages={725-743}
}
Our goal is to link spatial and temporal properties of letter recognition to reading speed for text viewed centrally or in peripheral vision. We propose that the size of the visual span - the number of letters recognizable in a glance - imposes a fundamental limit on reading speed, and that shrinkage of the visual span in peripheral vision accounts for slower peripheral reading. In Experiment 1, we estimated the size of the visual span in the lower visual field by measuring RSVP (rapid serial… Expand
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Dependence of Reading Speed on Letter Spacing in Central Vision Loss
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  • Psychology, Medicine
  • Optometry and vision science : official publication of the American Academy of Optometry
  • 2012
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Increased letter spacing beyond the standard size, which presumably reduces crowding among letters in text, does not improve reading speed for people with central vision loss and the optimal letter spacing for reading can be predicted based on the preferred retinal locus. Expand
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