Psychology of Computer Use: XLVII. Parameters of Internet Use, Abuse and Addiction: The First 90 Days of the Internet Usage Survey

@article{Brenner1997PsychologyOC,
  title={Psychology of Computer Use: XLVII. Parameters of Internet Use, Abuse and Addiction: The First 90 Days of the Internet Usage Survey},
  author={Viktor Brenner},
  journal={Psychological Reports},
  year={1997},
  volume={80},
  pages={879 - 882}
}
  • Viktor Brenner
  • Published 1 June 1997
  • Computer Science, Psychology
  • Psychological Reports
While the addictive potential of Internet usage is a topic that has attracted a great deal of attention, as yet little research has addressed this topic. Preliminary data from the Internet Usage Survey shows that most of the 563 users reported instances of Internet use interfering with other aspects of their lives, most commonly problems with managing time. A subgroup of users endorsed multiple usage-related problems, including several similar to those found in addictions. Younger users tended… 

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