Psychological outcome profiles in childhood-onset temporal lobe epilepsy.

Abstract

PURPOSE To examine the effect of childhood-onset temporal lobe epilepsy (TLE) on long-term psychological function and to identify outcome profiles related to the natural course and treatment of TLE. METHODS Psychological function was studied in a prospective, community-based cohort of childhood-onset TLE, approximately 13 years following seizure onset. Fifty-three patients were assessed using a semi-structured psychosocial interview, supplemented by self-report questionnaires measuring quality-of-life, depression, self-esteem, and anxiety. RESULTS Common patterns were observed, giving rise to four distinct patient groups and psychological outcomes: (1) patients who experienced spontaneous remission of their seizures fared best; their psychological profile was characterized by heightened worry about the possibility of seizure recurrence; (2) patients who progressed to surgery and were seizure free reported adjustment difficulties associated with learning to become "well"; (3) patients who progressed to surgery and were not seizure free had the poorest psychological outcomes, with depression featuring prominently; and (4) patients with ongoing intractable epilepsy reported psychological and social features consistent with the effects of their chronic illness. DISCUSSION Patients with childhood-onset TLE face distinctive long-term psychological challenges. The specific nature of these challenges can be understood in terms of the natural evolution and treatment of their epilepsy.

DOI: 10.1111/j.1528-1167.2010.02664.x

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@article{Micallef2010PsychologicalOP, title={Psychological outcome profiles in childhood-onset temporal lobe epilepsy.}, author={Silvana Micallef and Claire G Spooner and A. Simon Harvey and Jacquie A. Wrennall and Sarah J. Wilson}, journal={Epilepsia}, year={2010}, volume={51 10}, pages={2066-73} }