Psychological effects of chemical weapons: a follow-up study of First World War veterans

@article{Jones2008PsychologicalEO,
  title={Psychological effects of chemical weapons: a follow-up study of First World War veterans},
  author={Edgar Jones and B. S. Everitt and Stephen Ironside and Ian P. Palmer and Simon Wessely},
  journal={Psychological Medicine},
  year={2008},
  volume={38},
  pages={1419 - 1426}
}
Background Chemical weapons exercise an enduring and often powerful psychological effect. This had been recognized during the First World War when it was shown that the symptoms of stress mimicked those of mild exposure to gas. Debate about long-term effects followed the suggestion that gassing triggered latent tuberculosis. Method A random sample of 103 First World War servicemen awarded a war pension for the effects of gas, but without evidence of chronic respiratory pathology, were subjected… 
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