Psychological adjustment of parents of pediatric cancer patients revisited: five years later

@article{WijnbergWilliams2006PsychologicalAO,
  title={Psychological adjustment of parents of pediatric cancer patients revisited: five years later},
  author={Barbara J. Wijnberg-Williams and Willem A. Kamps and Ed C. Klip and Josette E. H. M. Hoekstra-Weebers},
  journal={Psycho‐Oncology},
  year={2006},
  volume={15}
}
We investigated the psychological functioning of parents of children suffering from pediatric cancer using a prospective design over a five‐year time period. Parents of children diagnosed with cancer participated at diagnosis (T1), six months (T2), twelve months (T3), and five years later (T4, n = 115). Repeated measures ANOVAs were calculated for the three measures of psychological distress (GHQ, SCL‐90 and STAI‐S) to examine changes over time and gender differences. Independent T‐tests were… 
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