Psychological Aposematism: An Evolutionary Analysis of Suicide

@article{Wiley2020PsychologicalAA,
  title={Psychological Aposematism: An Evolutionary Analysis of Suicide},
  author={J. Wiley},
  journal={Biological Theory},
  year={2020},
  pages={1-13}
}
  • J. Wiley
  • Published 25 May 2020
  • Psychology
  • Biological Theory
The evolutionary advantage of psychological phenomena can be gleaned by comparing them with physical traits that have proven adaptive in other organisms. The present article provides a novel evolutionary explanation of suicide in humans by comparing it with aposematism in insects. Aposematic insects are brightly colored, making them conspicuous to predators. However, such insects are equipped with toxins that cause a noxious reaction when eaten. Thus, the death of a few insects conditions… 
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