Psychiatric disorders in pregnancy.

@article{Levey2004PsychiatricDI,
  title={Psychiatric disorders in pregnancy.},
  author={L. Levey and K. Ragan and Amy Hower-Hartley and D. Newport and Z. Stowe},
  journal={Neurologic clinics},
  year={2004},
  volume={22 4},
  pages={
          863-93
        }
}
This review, although not exhaustive, provides information on the potential impact of psychiatric illness on obstetric outcome. There is clear evidence that psychiatric illness poses a risk to pregnancy outcome. There productive safety data on many of the available treatments fail to demonstrate a clear risk from treatment. The medications with clear teratogenic, neonatal, and developmental risks are, not surprisingly, those used to treat some of the most severe and debilitating psychiatric… Expand
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