Corpus ID: 51833564

Psychiatric complications of meditation practice.

@article{Epstein1981PsychiatricCO,
  title={Psychiatric complications of meditation practice.},
  author={M. Epstein and J. Lieff},
  journal={Journal of Transpersonal Psychology},
  year={1981}
}
One of the more widespread examples of modern adaptations of traditional consciousness training practices is the recent popularity of age-old meditation techniques among both the lay public and workers in the mental health field (Marmor 1980; Walsh, 1980). This comes at a time of relative estrangement between psychiatric and religious ideologies (Bergin, 1980)producing a conceptual gap that threatens an understanding of the meditative experience which may be demanded of therapists by patients… Expand
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