Pseudotoothed Birds (Aves, Odontopterygiformes) from the Early Tertiary of Morocco

@inproceedings{Bourdon2010PseudotoothedB,
  title={Pseudotoothed Birds (Aves, Odontopterygiformes) from the Early Tertiary of Morocco},
  author={Estelle Bourdon and Mbarek Amaghzaz and Ba{\^a}di Bouya},
  year={2010}
}
ABSTRACT We describe here new specimens of pseudotoothed birds (Odontopterygiformes) from the Upper Paleocene and Lower Eocene of the Ouled Abdoun Basin, Morocco. These Lower Paleogene fossils are among the oldest representatives of the Odontopterygiformes and include braincases, beak fragments, and long bones. Dasornis toliapica (Owen, 1873) (2–3 m wingspan) and Dasornis emuinus (Bowerbank, 1854) (3.5–4.5 m wingspan) were initially described from the Lower Eocene London Clay of Sheppey… 
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