Pseudomonas aeruginosa biofilms: role of the alginate exopolysaccharide

@article{Boyd2005PseudomonasAB,
  title={Pseudomonas aeruginosa biofilms: role of the alginate exopolysaccharide},
  author={Aoife Boyd and Ananda M. Chakrabarty},
  journal={Journal of Industrial Microbiology},
  year={2005},
  volume={15},
  pages={162-168}
}
Pseudomonas aeruginosa synthesizes an exopolysaccharide called alginate in response to environmental conditions. Alginate serves to protect the bacteria from adversity in its surroundings and also enhances adhesion to solid surfaces. Transcription of the alginate biosynthetic genes is induced upon attachment to the substratum and this leads to increased alginate production. As a result, biofilms develop which are advantageous to the survival and growth of the bacteria. In certain circimstances… 
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