Proximal weakness due to injury of the corticoreticular pathway in a patient with traumatic brain injury.

@article{Yeo2013ProximalWD,
  title={Proximal weakness due to injury of the corticoreticular pathway in a patient with traumatic brain injury.},
  author={Sang Seok Yeo and Seong Ho Kim and Sung Ho Jang},
  journal={NeuroRehabilitation},
  year={2013},
  volume={32 3},
  pages={
          665-9
        }
}
BACKGROUND The corticoreticular pathway (CRP) innervates the proximal muscles of extremities and axial muscles; therefore, it is involved in postural control and gait. We report on a patient who exhibited proximal weakness due to a CRP injury, which was evaluated using diffusion tensor tractography (DTT). METHODS A 62-year-old male patient who had been injured in a traffic accident underwent conservative management for a contusional hemorrhage in the right frontotemporal lobes, and a subdural… Expand
Delayed gait disturbance due to injury of the corticoreticular pathway in a patient with mild traumatic brain injury
TLDR
It appears that the proximal weakness of this patient was attributed to injury of both CRPs following head trauma, which was demonstrated by diffusion tensor imaging (DTI). Expand
Injury of the corticoreticular pathway in subarachnoid haemorrhage after rupture of a cerebral artery aneurysm.
TLDR
Cognitive corticoreticular pathway injury is common in patients with motor weakness after subarachnoid haemorrhage, and it appears to be related to weakness in the contralateral shoulder, hip and lower extremity. Expand
Characteristics of injury of the corticospinal tract and corticoreticular pathway in hemiparetic patients with putaminal hemorrhage
TLDR
The results indicate that the putaminal hemorrhage frequently accompanies injury of both the CST and CRP, and the CRP appears to be more vulnerable to putaminals hemorrhage than the CST. Expand
Disruption of the Corticoreticular Tract in Pediatric Patients With Trunk Instability: A Diffusion Tensor Tractography Study
The authors report the diffusion tensor tractography (DTT) findings of three pediatric patients with gait dysfunction and corticoreticular tract (CRT) disruption. All three patients showed unilateralExpand
Postural Instability in Patients With Injury of Corticoreticular Pathway Following Mild Traumatic Brain Injury
TLDR
Significantly lower tract volume of the CRP was observed in the patient group than in the control group with no significant difference in fractional anisotropy and apparent diffusion coefficient values. Expand
Gait deterioration due to neural degeneration of the corticoreticular pathway: a case report
  • S. Jang, H. Lee
  • Psychology, Medicine
  • Neural regeneration research
  • 2016
TLDR
A patient with intracerebral hemorrhages in both hemispheres, presenting with gait deterioration due to neural degeneration of the CRP, and results of diffusion tensor tractography (DTT) in a 64-year-old male patient with Gait deterioration. Expand
Corticoreticular Tract in the Human Brain: A Mini Review
TLDR
The CRT is reviewed with regard to its anatomy, function, and recovery mechanisms after injury, with particular focus on previous diffusion tensor tractography-based studies. Expand
Functional Role of the Corticoreticular Pathway in Chronic Stroke Patients
TLDR
The increased fiber volume of the CRP in the unaffected hemisphere seems to be related to walking ability in patients with chronic stroke, and the compensation of theCRP inThe unaffected hemisphere seem to be one of the mechanisms for recovery of walking ability after stroke. Expand
Corticoreticular tract lesion in children with developmental delay presenting with gait dysfunction and trunk instability
TLDR
Functional evaluation data and clinical manifestations were found to show strong correlations with CRT status, rather than with corticospinal tract status, and these findings suggest that CRTstatus appears to be clinically important for gait function and trunk stability in pediatric patients and DTT can help assessCRT status in pediatric Patients with gait dysfunction. Expand
Difference between injuries of the corticospinal tract and corticoreticulospinal tract in patients with diffuse axonal injury: a diffusion tensor tractography study
  • S. Jang, Y. Seo
  • Medicine
  • The International journal of neuroscience
  • 2019
TLDR
Injury of the CST and CRT was detected in patients with DAI using DTT and the CRT appeared to be more vulnerable to DAI than the CST. Expand
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