Proto-Uto-Aztecan: A Community of Cultivators in Central Mexico?

@article{Hill2001ProtoUtoAztecanAC,
  title={Proto-Uto-Aztecan: A Community of Cultivators in Central Mexico?},
  author={JANE H. Hill},
  journal={American Anthropologist},
  year={2001},
  volume={103},
  pages={913-934}
}
  • JANE H. Hill
  • Published 1 December 2001
  • Linguistics
  • American Anthropologist
Authorities on the origin and history of Uto-Aztecan have held that speakers of the protolanguage were foragers who lived in upland regions of Arizona, New Mexico, and the adjacent areas of the Mexican states of Sonora and Chihuahua about 5,000 years ago. New lexical evidence supports a different view, that speakers of the protolanguage were maize cultivators. The Proto-Uto-Aztecan speech community was probably located in Mesoamerica and spread northward into the present range because of… 
PROTO-UTO-AZTECAN AS A MESOAMERICAN LANGUAGE
Abstract New evidence is presented in support of the hypothesis that Proto-Uto-Aztecan (PUA) was spoken by a community of cultivators in the northwest quadrant of Mesoamerica. New cognates are
Proto-Uto-Aztecans on their way to the Proto-Aztecan homeland: linguistic evidence
The Uto-Aztecan language family is one of the largest genetically related groups of the Americas, whose speakers inhabited a vast territory, extending from the state of Oregon to Panama. The paper is
Uto-Aztecan Maize Agriculture: A Linguistic Puzzle from Southern California
Abstract:The hypothesis that the members of the Proto–Uto-Aztecan speech community were maize farmers is premised in part on the assumption that a Proto–Uto-Aztecan etymon for 'maize' can be
Uto-Aztecan Languages
New California Uto-Aztecan
  • JANE H. Hill
  • Linguistics
    Journal of Anthropological Research
  • 2015
Evidence that resemblances between Proto-Uto-Aztecan and several non-Uto-Aztecan languages of California are due to ancient language contact, presented in a revival of the hypothesis that the
New evidence for a Mesoamerican homeland for Proto-Uto-Aztecan
  • JANE H. Hill
  • Linguistics
    Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences
  • 2010
TLDR
The hypothesis that speakers of Proto-Uto-Aztecan (PUA) were maize cultivators in or near Mesoamerica is found “untenable” and linguistic evidence supporting this hypothesis is cited.
The genetic unity of Southern Uto-Aztecan
The internal structure of the Uto-Aztecan language family has been debated since the late 19th century, when the historical relationships among all of its major subdivisions were first recognized.
Northern Uto‐Aztecan and Kiowa‐Tanoan: Evidence of Contact between the Proto‐Languages?
  • JANE H. Hill
  • Linguistics
    International Journal of American Linguistics
  • 2008
Proto‐Northern‐Uto‐Aztecan (PNUA) and Proto‐Kiowa‐Tanoan (PKT) may have exchanged loanwords. It is suggested that this exchange of loan vocabulary is the linguistic aspect of an episode of contact
Behind the Mexican Mountains: Recent Developments and New Directions in Research on Uto-Aztecan Languages
TLDR
It is argued that deepening understanding of Uto-Aztecan languages, especially those of Northern Mexico, will not only positively contribute to community-based efforts of language maintenance, it will also provide crucial keys to linguistic typology, developing linguistic theories, as well as the reconstruction of the linguistic and cultural past of the Americas.
Development of Agriculture in Prehistoric Mesoamerica: The Linguistic Evidence
This study uses linguistic data to reconstruct the prehistory of agriculture in Mesoamerica, a cultural and linguistic area of Mexico and northern Central America. Evidence is assembled indicating
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