Proto-Algonquian-Ritwan Verbal Roots

@article{Berman1984ProtoAlgonquianRitwanVR,
  title={Proto-Algonquian-Ritwan Verbal Roots},
  author={Howard Berman},
  journal={International Journal of American Linguistics},
  year={1984},
  volume={50},
  pages={335 - 342}
}
  • Howard Berman
  • Published 1 July 1984
  • Linguistics
  • International Journal of American Linguistics
0. Introduction. In this article I present a list of the Proto-AlgonquianRitwan verbs arranged according to the shapes of their roots.' This list includes all verbs I have been able to reconstruct with some degree of confidence. I describe the vowel alternations shown by a few of the verbs and discuss the role of these alternations in the protolanguage. I hope also in this article to refute the statement that good AlgonquianRitwan cognate sets are limited to pronouns, lower numbers, and… 
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