Proto-Algic II: Verbs

@article{Proulx1985ProtoAlgicIV,
  title={Proto-Algic II: Verbs},
  author={Paul Proulx},
  journal={International Journal of American Linguistics},
  year={1985},
  volume={51},
  pages={59 - 93}
}
  • P. Proulx
  • Published 1 January 1985
  • Linguistics
  • International Journal of American Linguistics
0. Introduction. In a recent article (Proulx 1984b) I described the phonological system of Proto-Algic (Algonquian-Wiyot-Yurok) in some detail and briefly discussed the methodological questions that arise in the reconstruction of such protolanguages of the second order. In particular, I pointed out the inseparable nature of the phonological and grammatical systems, and the necessity of reconstructing both before either can be taken as firmly established. This article, then, is intended as a… 
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  • Linguistics
    International Journal of American Linguistics
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    International Journal of American Linguistics
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  • Linguistics
    International Journal of American Linguistics
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  • Linguistics
    International Journal of American Linguistics
  • 1980
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    International Journal of American Linguistics
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