Proto-Algic I: Phonological Sketch

@article{Proulx1984ProtoAlgicIP,
  title={Proto-Algic I: Phonological Sketch},
  author={Paul Proulx},
  journal={International Journal of American Linguistics},
  year={1984},
  volume={50},
  pages={165 - 207}
}
  • P. Proulx
  • Published 1 April 1984
  • Linguistics
  • International Journal of American Linguistics
0. Introduction. Algonqian-Wiyot-Yurok is one of the more distant genetic relationships regarded as definitely established by adherents of the "splitting" tradition of historical Amerindian linguistics (Campbell and Mithun 1979:37-40).1 Indeed, from 1913-when Sapir first proposed it-until 1958 there was academic controversy about whether the three branches were genetically related at all (Haas 1958:sec. 1). Since 1958, it has been a favorite example (in methodological discussions) of a proven… 
Proto-Algonquian-Ritwan Verbal Roots
  • Howard Berman
  • Linguistics
    International Journal of American Linguistics
  • 1984
0. Introduction. In this article I present a list of the Proto-AlgonquianRitwan verbs arranged according to the shapes of their roots.' This list includes all verbs I have been able to reconstruct
Toward the reconstruction of Proto-Algonquian-Wakashan. Part 3: The Algonquian-Wakashan 110-item wordlist
In the third part of my complex study of the historical relations between several language families of North America and the Nivkh language in the Far East, I present an annotated demonstration of
A Sketch of Blackfoot Historical Phonology
  • P. Proulx
  • Linguistics
    International Journal of American Linguistics
  • 1989
I Languages, their abbreviations, and the sources from which they are generally cited are as follows: Abenaki-Ab Laurent (1884), Day (1964); Arapaho-A Goddard (1974a); Blackfoot-B Taylor (1969);
Toward the reconstruction of Proto-Algonquian-Wakashan. Part 2: Algonquian-Wakashan sound correspondences
The second part of the present study, continuing an earlier publication by the author in a previous number of JLR, includes: an inventory of Proto-Algonquian-Wakashan phonemes with a list of
Patterns of contrast in phonological change: Evidence from Algonquian vowel systems
This article proposes that patterns of phonological contrast should be added to the list of factors that influence sound change. It adopts a hierarchically determined model of contrast that allows
First-person n and second-person m in Native America: a fresh look
The presence of a pronominal set with 'n' in the first person and 'm' in the second person in numerous Native American languages has been known for more than one century. The number (also
Proto-Amerind Numerals
TLDR
Comparative linguistic evidence indicates that Proto-Amerind-the language from which all Amerind languages derive-used a system of counting in which an obligatory numeral prefix, *ne-, preceded the numeral root.
One Case of Contrast Evolution in the Yurok Vowel System1
This paper examines a case of contrast evolution in Yurok, an Algic language. Former *e has split into two vowels, e and a, due to phonetically conditioned vowel lowering which was rendered opaque by
The Rise and Fall of l Sandhi in California Algic
The two Algic languages of California, Wiyot and Yurok, have comparable external sandhi patterns whereby initial h surfaces as l after certain preverbs. We argue that h ⇒ l sandhi in each language
Reduplication in Proto‐Algonquian and Proto‐Central‐Algonquian
  • P. Proulx
  • Linguistics
    International Journal of American Linguistics
  • 2005
Proto‐Algonquian Ca‐reduplication (“light” reduplication) was used for time‐stable states or event‐internal repetitions, with ablaut of stem‐vowel Proto‐Algonquian *e to Proto‐Algonquian *a: in some
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  • Linguistics
    International Journal of American Linguistics
  • 1958
1. Wiyot and Yurok, isolated languages of northern California, are conveniently classed together under the name Ritwan (Dixon and Kroeber, 1913) and it is the purpose of this paper to present
A St. Francis Abenaki Vocabulary
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  • Linguistics
    International Journal of American Linguistics
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2 Albert Gallatin, A Synopsis of the Indian Tribes Within the United States East of the Rocky Mountains, and in the British and Russian Possessions in North America, Transactions and Collections of
The Semantics of Certain Abstract Elements in the Algonquian Verb
The Montagnais forms were collected by Jose Mailhot. The Ojibwa forms come from Glyne L. Piggott and Jonathan Kaye, Odawa Language Project: Second Report (Toronto: Centre for Linguistic Studies,
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    International Journal of American Linguistics
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A detailed account of vowel length in Micmac, an Algonquian language spoken in the Maritime provinces of Canada, shows that in certain cases, vowel length in that language cannot be accounted for by
An Outline of the Historical Phonology of Arapaho and Atsina
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    International Journal of American Linguistics
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1. Proto-Algonquian sound system 2.1. From Proto-Algonquian to ProtoArapaho-Atsina 2.2. Rules (1) through (5) 2.3. Rules (6) through (12) 2.4. Other changes; clusters 2.5. Vowel contraction and
Some Algic Etymologies
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    International Journal of American Linguistics
  • 1974
1. Historical study of Algic presents a situation not unique to Algic, and consequently it will be in order first to place this situation in context. Some groups of languages which seem to belong
New Notes on the Mesquakie (Fox) Language
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    International Journal of American Linguistics
  • 1971
0. The following notes on Mesquakie (= Fox) grammar supplement Leonard Bloomfield, Notes on the Fox Language,' hereafter referred to as B. (Since the speakers of the language prefer the name
A Grammar of Blackfoot
A Grammar of Blackfoot By Allan Ross Taylor A.B. (University of Colorado) 1953 DISSERTATION Submitted in partial satisfaction of the requirements for the degree of DOCTOR OF PHILOSOPHY in Linguistics
Archaeological Inference and Inductive Confirmation
TLDR
An alternate method, the hypothetico-analog (H-A) method, is proposed as being more appropriate for archaeological inference and can be characterized as a modified and supplemented form of the simple H-D method.
A proto-Algonquian dictionary
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