Protestant Fundamentalism and Attitudes Toward Corporal Punishment of Children

@article{Grasmick1991ProtestantFA,
  title={Protestant Fundamentalism and Attitudes Toward Corporal Punishment of Children},
  author={Harold G. Grasmick and Robert J. Jr. Bursik and M Kimpel},
  journal={Violence and Victims},
  year={1991},
  volume={6},
  pages={283 - 298}
}
The present research demonstrates what others have suspected: Protestant fWldamentalism is closely linked to favorable attitudes toward corporal punishment of children in the home and the school. The relationship persists with controls for socioeconomic and demographic variables. Three explanations of the greater support for corporal punishment among people affiliated with fundamentalist denominations are tested. Greater personal religiosity and adherence to a punitive image of God account for… 
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