Proteolytic activity in the human stomach during digestion and its correlation with the augmented histamine test.

Abstract

The gastric secretory capacity may be determined in man by the augmented histamine test introduced by Kay (1953). The gastric juice aspirated during this test is the response to a maximal histamine stimulation and the output of hydrochloric acid has been shown to be closely correlated to the parietal cell mass (Card and Marks, 1960). The variations in concentration and volume of the hydrochloric acid secreted during this test show a significant tendency toward a higher secretion of acid in patients with duodenal ulcer than in normal individuals. As a consequence the augmented histamine test is of considerable help in the establishment of the diagnosis and it is today widely used as a guide to treatment. These clinical applications of the test results are based on the assumption that there exists a close correlation between the result of the augmented histamine test and the gastric secretion when food is used as a physiological stimulus. It is therefore important to measure the relationship between the gastric secretion stimulated by food and the response to maximal histamine stimulation. Quantitative determination of the acid secreted during digestion of normal food is not possible because juice with an unknown composition will leave the stomach through the pylorus before the stomach contents can be aspirated. As a consequence no reports exist giving quantitative determinations of the gastric secretion after ingestion of normal

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Cite this paper

@article{Rune1966ProteolyticAI, title={Proteolytic activity in the human stomach during digestion and its correlation with the augmented histamine test.}, author={Simon J. Rune}, journal={Gut}, year={1966}, volume={7 1}, pages={69-72} }