Corpus ID: 43010550

Protein-induced hypercalciuria.

@article{Linkswiler1981ProteininducedH,
  title={Protein-induced hypercalciuria.},
  author={Hellen Linkswiler and Michael B Zemel and Mark Hegsted and Sally A. Schuette},
  journal={Federation proceedings},
  year={1981},
  volume={40 9},
  pages={
          2429-33
        }
}
Under controlled dietary conditions the level of dietary protein has a profound and sustained effect on urinary calcium and calcium retention of man. Young adults achieve calcium balance at low intakes of 500 mg calcium and 700 to 1,000 mg phosphorus when protein intake is 50 g. Large calcium losses occur at the same calcium and phosphorus intakes when the protein intake is increased approximately threefold. The protein-induced hypercalciuria is due mainly to a decrease in fractional renal… Expand
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