Protein-coated poly(L-lactic acid) fibers provide a substrate for differentiation of human skeletal muscle cells.

@article{Cronin2004ProteincoatedPA,
  title={Protein-coated poly(L-lactic acid) fibers provide a substrate for differentiation of human skeletal muscle cells.},
  author={Elizabeth M Cronin and Frederick A. Thurmond and Rhonda Bassel-Duby and R. Sanders Williams and Woodring E Wright and Kevin D. Nelson and Harold R. Garner},
  journal={Journal of biomedical materials research. Part A},
  year={2004},
  volume={69 3},
  pages={373-81}
}
Tissue engineering represents a potential method for repairing damaged skeletal muscle tissue. Extracellular matrix (ECM) proteins were evaluated for their ability to aid in cell attachment, whereas a poly(L-lactic acid) (PLLA) fiber scaffold was tested as a substrate for the differentiation of human skeletal muscle cells. In comparison to uncoated or gelatin-coated PLLA films, cell attachment increased significantly (p < 0.001) on PLLA films coated with ECM gel, fibronectin, or laminin… CONTINUE READING
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