Protein- and diabetes-induced glomerular hyperfiltration: role of glucagon, vasopressin, and urea.

@article{Bankir2015ProteinAD,
  title={Protein- and diabetes-induced glomerular hyperfiltration: role of glucagon, vasopressin, and urea.},
  author={Lise Bankir and Ronan Roussel and N Bouby},
  journal={American journal of physiology. Renal physiology},
  year={2015},
  volume={309 1},
  pages={
          F2-23
        }
}
A single protein-rich meal (or an infusion of amino acids) is known to increase the glomerular filtration rate (GFR) for a few hours, a phenomenon known as "hyperfiltration." It is important to understand the factors that initiate this upregulation because it becomes maladaptive in the long term. Several mediators and paracrine factors have been shown to participate in this upregulation, but they are not directly triggered by protein intake. Here, we explain how a rise in glucagon and in… Expand
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