Protein and amino acids for athletes

@article{Tipton2004ProteinAA,
  title={Protein and amino acids for athletes},
  author={K. Tipton and R. Wolfe},
  journal={Journal of Sports Sciences},
  year={2004},
  volume={22},
  pages={65 - 79}
}
The main determinants of an athlete's protein needs are their training regime and habitual nutrient intake. Most athletes ingest sufficient protein in their habitual diet. Additional protein will confer only a minimal, albeit arguably important, additional advantage. Given sufficient energy intake, lean body mass can be maintained within a wide range of protein intakes. Since there is limited evidence for harmful effects of a high protein intake and there is a metabolic rationale for the… Expand
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