Protein Superfamily Evolution and the Last Universal Common Ancestor (LUCA)

@article{Ranea2005ProteinSE,
  title={Protein Superfamily Evolution and the Last Universal Common Ancestor (LUCA)},
  author={Juan Garcia Ranea and Antonio Sillero and Janet M. Thornton and Christine A. Orengo},
  journal={Journal of Molecular Evolution},
  year={2005},
  volume={63},
  pages={513-525}
}
By exploiting three-dimensional structure comparison, which is more sensitive than conventional sequence-based methods for detecting remote homology, we have identified a set of 140 ancestral protein domains using very restrictive criteria to minimize the potential error introduced by horizontal gene transfer. These domains are highly likely to have been present in the Last Universal Common Ancestor (LUCA) based on their universality in almost all of 114 completed prokaryotic (Bacteria and… Expand
[Luca: the last universal common ancestor].
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