Protective gloves in Swedish dentistry: use and side‐effects

@article{Wrangsj2001ProtectiveGI,
  title={Protective gloves in Swedish dentistry: use and side‐effects},
  author={Karin Wrangsj{\"o} and L‐M. Wallenhammar and Ulf {\"O}rtengren and Lars Barregard and Harriet Andreasson and Bert Bj{\"o}rkner and Stig Karlsson and Birgitta Meding},
  journal={British Journal of Dermatology},
  year={2001},
  volume={145}
}
Background During the 1980s routine wearing of gloves in dentistry was recommended by health authorities in several countries. However, prolonged glove use is associated with side‐effects of irritant and allergic origin. 
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Occupational hazards in orthodontics: a review of risks and associated pathology.
  • N. Pandis, Brandi D Pandis, Vasilios Pandis, T. Eliades
  • Medicine
  • American journal of orthodontics and dentofacial orthopedics : official publication of the American Association of Orthodontists, its constituent societies, and the American Board of Orthodontics
  • 2007
TLDR
Potentially hazardous factors relate to the general practice setting; to specific materials and tools that expose the operator to vision and hearing risks; to chemical substances with known allergenic, toxic, or irritating actions; and to psychological stress with proven undesirable sequelae. Expand
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