Protective effect of antibody to parainfluenza type 1 virus.

@article{Smith1966ProtectiveEO,
  title={Protective effect of antibody to parainfluenza type 1 virus.},
  author={C. Smith and R. Purcell and J. Bellanti and R. Chanock},
  journal={The New England journal of medicine},
  year={1966},
  volume={275 21},
  pages={
          1145-52
        }
}
PARAINFLUENZA Type 1 virus is an important cause of acute respiratory disease in infants and children.1 , 2 During primary infection the lower respiratory tract is often involved, and illness may be quite severe. Initial infection usually occurs during childhood, and most older children and adults have serum neutralizing antibody to this virus.2 Reinfection with Type 1 virus has been observed in adults under both experimental and natural conditions despite the presence of serum neutralizing… Expand
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