Protection of the Neonate by the Innate Immune System of Developing Gut and of Human Milk

@article{Newburg2007ProtectionOT,
  title={Protection of the Neonate by the Innate Immune System of Developing Gut and of Human Milk},
  author={David S Newburg and W. Walker},
  journal={Pediatric Research},
  year={2007},
  volume={61},
  pages={2-8}
}
The neonatal adaptive immune system, relatively naïve to foreign antigens, requires synergy with the innate immune system to protect the intestine. Goblet cells provide mucins, Paneth cells produce antimicrobial peptides, and dendritic cells (DCs) present luminal antigens. Intracellular signaling by Toll-like receptors (TLRs) elicits chemokines and cytokines that modulate inflammation. Enteric neurons and lymphocytes provide paracrine and endocrine signaling. However, full protection requires… Expand
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