Protection from Sunburn with β‐Carotene—A Meta‐analysis †

@article{Kpcke2008ProtectionFS,
  title={Protection from Sunburn with $\beta$‐Carotene—A Meta‐analysis †},
  author={Wolfgang K{\"o}pcke and Jean Krutmann},
  journal={Photochemistry and Photobiology},
  year={2008},
  volume={84}
}
Nutritional protection against skin damage from sunlight is increasingly advocated to the general public, but its effectiveness is controversial. In this meta‐analysis, we have systematically reviewed the existing literature on human supplementation studies on dietary protection against sunburn by beta‐carotene. A review of literature until June 2007 was performed in PubMed, ISI Web of Science and EBM Cochrane library and identified a total of seven studies which evaluated the effectiveness of… 
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TLDR
Oral beta‐carotene supplementation is unlikely to modify the severity of cutaneous photodamage in normal individuals to a clinically meaningful degree, and provided no clinically or histologically detectable protection against a 3 MED sunburn reaction.
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TLDR
Long-term supplementation for 12 wk with 24 mg/d of a carotenoid mix supplying similar amounts of beta-carotene, lutein and lycopene ameliorates UV-induced erythema in humans; the effect is comparable to daily treatment with 24mg of Beta- carotene alone.
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