Prostate cancer diagnosed after initial biopsy with atypical small acinar proliferation suspicious for malignancy is similar to cancer found on initial biopsy.

@article{Iczkowski2002ProstateCD,
  title={Prostate cancer diagnosed after initial biopsy with atypical small acinar proliferation suspicious for malignancy is similar to cancer found on initial biopsy.},
  author={Kenneth A. Iczkowski and Helen M. Chen and Ximing J. Yang and Robyn A Beach},
  journal={Urology},
  year={2002},
  volume={60 5},
  pages={
          851-4
        }
}
OBJECTIVES To compare matched clinical and prostatectomy data between (a) men with an initial biopsy diagnosis of atypical small acinar proliferation (ASAP) suspicious for malignancy whose cancer was diagnosed subsequently, and (b) men with a cancer diagnosis not preceded by an ASAP diagnosis. ASAP diagnoses apply to 1.5%-9.0% of prostatic biopsies and predict definite cancer in about 45% of repeat biopsies. METHODS At our hospitals, during overlapping intervals from 1990 to 2001, 7081 men… 
Predictive Factors of Prostate Cancer at Repeat Biopsy in Patients with an Initial Diagnosis of Atypical Small Acinar Proliferation of the Prostate
TLDR
PSAD, PSAV, and TPV are predictive factors of prostate cancer in patients with an initial diagnosis of ASAP of the prostate, and the follow-up of PSA may help to estimate the probability of cancer in these men.
Initial atypical diagnosis with carcinoma on subsequent prostate needle biopsy: findings at radical prostatectomy.
TLDR
Prostate cancer diagnosed on needle biopsy following a diagnosis of atypical glands suspicious but not diagnostic for carcinoma demonstrates a significantly lower tumor grade and pathological stage at radical prostatectomy than cancer without such a diagnosis.
Clinicopathological features of prostate cancers detected after an initial diagnosis of ‘atypical glands suspicious for cancer’
TLDR
Most prostate cancers detected following an initial diagnosis of ATYP are clinically significant, and patients with a diagnosis of AtYP should be followed up aggressively.
Prostate Cancer Detection Rate of Rebiopsy in Patients with an Initial Diagnosis of Atypical Small Acinar Proliferation of the Prostate
Purpose: Atypical small acinar proliferation (ASAP) denotes the presence of suspicious glands with insufficient cytological architecture for a definitive prostate cancer diagnosis. We evaluated the
False-negative Prostate Needle Biopsies: Frequency, Histopathologic Features, and Follow-up
TLDR
Routine examination of at least 1 level of prostate biopsies sets at high magnification and awareness of histologic prostate cancer variants might reduce the risk of missing or misinterpreting a relevant lesion at prostate biopsy evaluation.
Repeat prostate biopsies following diagnoses of prostate intraepithelial neoplasia and atypical small gland proliferation.
TLDR
Despite explicit recommendations of repeat biopsy on pathology reports and the high incidence of adenocarcinoma on repeat biopsies, re-intervention rates following a diagnosis of PIN, ASAP, PIN + ASAP are low in a uropathology reference center.
Pathologic Results of Radical Prostatectomies in Patients with Simultaneous Atypical Small Acinar Proliferation and Prostate Cancer
TLDR
Aggressive approaches including more extended repeat biopsy with additional biopsy of the site of the ASAP are needed to diagnose PCa in patients with ASAP.
High-Grade Prostatic Intraepithelial Neoplasia and Atypical Small Acinar Proliferation: Predictive Value for Cancer in Current Practice
TLDR
Factors that may account for the decline in PIN predictive values include: 1) extended biopsy techniques that yield higher rates of initial cancer detection, 2) lower detection rate for the remaining small cancers that may accompany PIN, and 3) remaining PIN cases may lack concomitant cancer.
Multiple cores of high grade prostatic intraepithelial neoplasia and any core of atypia on first biopsy are significant predictor for cancer detection at a repeat biopsy
TLDR
Patients with multiple cores of HGPIN or any core number of ASAP on a first biopsy had a significantly higher cancer detection rate on a second biopsy.
Prostate needle biopsies containing prostatic intraepithelial neoplasia or atypical foci suspicious for carcinoma: implications for patient care.
TLDR
It is critical for urologists to distinguish between a diagnosis of HGPIN and that of atypical foci suspicious for cancer on needle biopsy, as these 2 entities indicate different risks of carcinoma on re-biopsy and different recommendations for followup.
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