Prospective study of adiposity and weight change in relation to prostate cancer incidence and mortality

@article{Wright2007ProspectiveSO,
  title={Prospective study of adiposity and weight change in relation to prostate cancer incidence and mortality},
  author={Margaret E. Wright and Shih-chen Chang and Arthur Schatzkin and Demetrius Albanes and Victor Kipnis and Traci Mouw and Paul E. Hurwitz and Albert R. Hollenbeck and Michael F. Leitzmann},
  journal={Cancer},
  year={2007},
  volume={109}
}
Adiposity has been linked inconsistently with prostate cancer, and few studies have evaluated whether such associations vary by disease aggressiveness. 
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TLDR
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TLDR
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