Proprioception and Motor Control in Parkinson's Disease

@article{Konczak2009ProprioceptionAM,
  title={Proprioception and Motor Control in Parkinson's Disease},
  author={J{\"u}rgen Konczak and Daniel M. Corcos and Fay B. Horak and Howard Poizner and Mark B. Shapiro and Paul Tuite and Jens Volkmann and M. Maschke},
  journal={Journal of Motor Behavior},
  year={2009},
  volume={41},
  pages={543 - 552}
}
ABSTRACT Parkinson's disease (PD) is a neurodegenerative disorder that leads to a progressive decline in motor function. Growing evidence indicates that PD patients also experience an array of sensory problems that negatively impact motor function. This is especially true for proprioceptive deficits, which profoundly degrade motor performance. This review specifically address the relation between proprioception and motor impairments in PD. It is structured around 4 themes: (a) It examines… 
Attenuated beta rebound to proprioceptive afferent feedback in Parkinson’s disease
TLDR
A disease-related deterioration in cortical processing of proprioceptive afference in PD is demonstrated, and processes outside the dopaminergic system affected by levodopa medication are suggested to be responsible.
Attenuated post-movement beta rebound in Parkinson’s disease to proprioceptive afferent feedback
TLDR
A disease-related deterioration in cortical processing of proprioceptive afference in PD is demonstrated, and processes outside the dopaminergic system affected by levodopa medication are suggested to be responsible.
Attenuated beta rebound to proprioceptive afferent feedback in Parkinson’s disease
TLDR
A disease-related deterioration in cortical processing of proprioceptive afference in Parkinson’s disease patients, ON/OFF levodopa medication, is demonstrated.
Pathophysiology of somatosensory abnormalities in Parkinson disease
TLDR
It is argued that abnormal spatial and temporal processing of sensory information produces incorrect signals for the preparation and execution of voluntary movement and is likely to be a consequence of the dopaminergic denervation of the basal ganglia that is the hallmark of PD.
Somatosensory Training Improves Proprioception and Untrained Motor Function in Parkinson's Disease
TLDR
Proprioceptive function in mild to moderate PD is trainable and improves with a somatosensory-focused motor training, and learning showed a local transfer within the trained joint degree-of-freedom as improved spatial accuracy in an unpracticed motor task.
Reaching and Grasping Movements in Parkinson's Disease: A Review.
TLDR
This review summarizes the literature results on reaching and grasping in parkinsonian patients and analyzes the relevant hypotheses on the origins of dysfunction, by focusing on the motor control aspects involved in the different movement phases and the corresponding role played by the BG.
Sensory attenuation in Parkinson’s disease is related to disease severity and dopamine dose
TLDR
It is suggested that dopamine could regulate the integration of sensorimotor prediction with sensory information to facilitate the control of voluntary movements in Parkinson’s disease patients.
Name of Disorder: Parkinson's disease Essay Title: Proprioception during Parkinson's disease
TLDR
One consequence of these proprioceptive deficits is that Parkinson's disease patients rely more on their vision to control movement, including walking, and if vision is impaired, movement is more difficult and the risk of falling is increased.
Sensory attenuation is related to dopamine dose in Parkinson’s disease
TLDR
It is suggested that dopamine could regulate the integration of sensorimotor prediction with sensory information to facilitate the control of voluntary movements in Parkinson’s disease.
Hand Function in Parkinson’s Disease
TLDR
It is hypothesized that predictive force control deficits are a result of central impairments associated with the generation and/or retrieval of sensorimotor memories for movement planning.
...
1
2
3
4
5
...

References

SHOWING 1-10 OF 117 REFERENCES
Neurophysiology of sensorimotor integration in Parkinson's disease.
TLDR
The transient recovery of frontal SEP amplitude after apomorphine, a potent dopamine agonist drug, is a good and specific predictor of the clinical response of PD patients to L-dopa therapy.
Proprioception in Parkinson's disease is acutely depressed by dopaminergic medications
TLDR
Administration of levodopa and dopamine agonists were associated with a modest acute suppression in central responsiveness to joint position, and it is speculated that compensatory exaggerated movement could account in part for the phenomenon of drug induced dyskinesias.
Sensorimotor integration in movement disorders
TLDR
Several observations strongly support the idea that sensorimotor integration is impaired in focal dystonia, and underlines the importance of abnormal sensorim motor integration in the pathophysiology of movement disorders.
Dysfunction of the basal ganglia, but not the cerebellum, impairs kinaesthesia.
TLDR
The results imply that an intact cerebro-basal ganglia loop is essential for awareness of limb position and suggest a selective role of the basal ganglia but not the cerebellum in kinaesthesia.
Proprioceptive sensory function in Parkinson's disease and Huntington's disease: evidence from proprioception-related EEG potentials
TLDR
The results show largely normal early proprioception-related potentials, but changes in the cortical processing of kinaesthetic signals at longer latencies in both diseases.
A defect of kinesthesia in Parkinson's disease
TLDR
The data suggest that PD patients have a defect of kinesthesia in slowly executed movements, and it is unlikely that disturbed corollary discharge is responsible for hypometria under nonvisual conditions.
Dynamic estimation of hand position is abnormal in Parkinson's disease.
Visuo-cognitive dysfunctions in Parkinson's disease.
TLDR
Some current results to show the connection between clinical symptoms and neuropsychological deficits are discussed, and dysfunction in underlying neural mechanisms are considered, with particular emphasis on the dysregulation of fronto-striatal circuits.
Depth perception in cerebellar and basal ganglia disease
TLDR
It is concluded that basal ganglia as well as cerebellar disease may affect the visual perception of depth in patients with Parkinson’s disease and patients with spinocerebellar ataxia.
...
1
2
3
4
5
...