Propolis and bee health: the natural history and significance of resin use by honey bees

@article{SimoneFinstrom2011PropolisAB,
  title={Propolis and bee health: the natural history and significance of resin use by honey bees},
  author={Michael Simone-Finstrom and Marla Spivak},
  journal={Apidologie},
  year={2011},
  volume={41},
  pages={295-311}
}
Social immunity, which describes how individual behaviors of group members effectively reduce disease and parasite transmission at the colony level, is an emerging field in social insect biology. An understudied, but significant behavioral disease resistance mechanism in honey bees is their collection and use of plant resins. Honey bees harvest resins with antimicrobial properties from various plant species and bring them back to the colony where they are then mixed with varying amounts of wax… Expand

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