Propionibacterium acnes Resistance: A Worldwide Problem

@article{Eady2003PropionibacteriumAR,
  title={Propionibacterium acnes Resistance: A Worldwide Problem},
  author={E.A. Eady and Max Gloor and James J. Leyden},
  journal={Dermatology},
  year={2003},
  volume={206},
  pages={54 - 56}
}
Antibiotic therapy directed against Propionibacterium acnes has been a mainstay of treatment for more than 40 years. Despite years of widespread use of systemic tetracyclines and erythromycin, change in P. acnes sensitivity to antibiotics was not seen until the early 1980s. The first clinically relevant changes in P. acnes antibiotic sensitivity were found in the USA shortly after the introduction of topical formulations of erythromycin and clindamycin. By the late 1980s, P. acnes strains with… 
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Investigation of the isolation rate of P. acnes and its antibiotic susceptibility to widely used antibiotics in acne in Korea found it to be low, but at this point, there is an increasing trend of MIC.
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Non-antibiotic Isotretinoin Treatment Differentially Controls Propionibacterium acnes on Skin of Acne Patients
TLDR
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Bacteriological resistance in acne: A call to action
  • B. Dréno
  • Medicine
    European Journal of Dermatology
  • 2016
TLDR
Correct and appropriate use of antibiotics in the treatment of acne will help to preserve their utility in the face of increasing antibiotic resistance but greater awareness of the issues is required among prescribing physicians.
Antimicrobial susceptibility of strains of Propionibacterium acnes isolated from inflammatory acne.
TLDR
The antimicrobial susceptibility of 53 strains of P. acnes isolated from skin specimens of inflammatory acne patients, at the clinical Hospital University of Chile was tested, and all isolates were susceptible to penicillin, minocycline, and nadifloxacin.
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