Prophylaxis with resin in wood ants

@article{Castella2008ProphylaxisWR,
  title={Prophylaxis with resin in wood ants},
  author={Gr{\'e}goire Castella and Michel Chapuisat and Philippe Christe},
  journal={Animal Behaviour},
  year={2008},
  volume={75},
  pages={1591-1596}
}
Animals may use plant compounds to defend themselves against parasites. Wood ants, Formica paralugubris, incorporate pieces of solidified conifer resin into their nests. This behaviour inhibits the growth of bacteria and fungi in nest material and protects the ants against some detrimental microorganisms. Here, we studied the resin-collecting behaviour of ants under field and laboratory conditions. First, we focused on an important assumption of the self-medication hypothesis, which is that the… Expand

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