Properties of corneal receptors in a teleost fish

@article{Ashley2006PropertiesOC,
  title={Properties of corneal receptors in a teleost fish},
  author={Paul J. Ashley and Lynne U. Sneddon and Catherine Mccrohan},
  journal={Neuroscience Letters},
  year={2006},
  volume={410},
  pages={165-168}
}
Corneal receptors have not previously been identified in lower vertebrates. The present study describes the properties of trigeminal ganglion corneal receptors in a teleost fish, the rainbow trout (Oncoryhnchus mykiss). Out of 27 receptors, 7 were polymodal nociceptors, 6 were mechanothermal nociceptors, 2 were mechanochemical receptors and the largest group, 12, were only responsive to mechanical stimulation. No cold responsive receptors were found on the trout cornea. Mechanical and thermal… Expand

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