Proper size of the visible Universe in FRW metrics with a constant spacetime curvature

@article{Melia2013ProperSO,
  title={Proper size of the visible Universe in FRW metrics with a constant spacetime curvature},
  author={Fulvio Melia},
  journal={Classical and Quantum Gravity},
  year={2013},
  volume={30},
  pages={155007}
}
  • F. Melia
  • Published 3 July 2012
  • Physics
  • Classical and Quantum Gravity
In this paper, we continue to examine the fundamental basis for the Friedmann–Robertson–Walker (FRW) metric and its application to cosmology, specifically addressing the question: What is the proper size of the visible universe? There are several ways of answering the question of size, though often with an incomplete understanding of how far light has actually traveled in reaching us today from the most remote sources. The difficulty usually arises from an inconsistent use of the coordinates or… 

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